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1 edition of Simulation of nitrogen movement, transformation, and uptake in plant root zone found in the catalog.

Simulation of nitrogen movement, transformation, and uptake in plant root zone

Simulation of nitrogen movement, transformation, and uptake in plant root zone

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  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Environmental Research Laboratory in Athens, Ga, Springfield, Va. : b for sale by the National Technical Information Service .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soils -- Nitrogen content.,
  • Plant-soil relationships.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby James M. Davidson ... [et al.]. ; University of Flordia.
    SeriesEcological research series ; EPA-600/3-78-029
    ContributionsDavidson, James M., University of Florida., Environmental Research Laboratory (Athens, Ga.).
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 106 p. :
    Number of Pages106
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17647221M

      Our representation of plant N uptake per unit soil volume at depth z in terms of one equation for plant-available N at z and one for the fraction of available N taken up by roots, with root biomass and its depth distribution held constant over time, is a gross simplification of the complex processes, including root–microbe interactions that Cited by: Uptake of organic nitrogen by plants. involve the movement of amino acids over root plasma. uptake of amino acids by plant roots and the soil studies.

    Nitrogen transformations include nitrification, mineralization, uptake, volatilization, denitrification, and leaching. The lower zone activities include plant uptake of water and nitrogen. Soil water is budgeted using a simplified water balance that considers runoff after a heavy rainfall, evapotranspiration, water movement between layers, and Cited by: Most plants use nitrate (NO3-) as their major nitrogen (N) source. The NO3- uptake capacity of a plant is determined by three interdependent factors that are sensitive to NO3- availability: (i) the functional properties of the transporters in roots that contribute to the acquisition of NO3- from the external medium, (ii) the density of functional transporters at the plasma membrane of root Cited by:

    Empirical Mathematical-Model to Describe Plant Root Systems. J. App. Eco. 11, a specific root architecture insoil profile –the intentions was to approximate actually N uptake in the whole rooting zone. And make a simulation tool to avoid nitrate leaching in short cereal and vegetable rotations! which controls root nitrogen. Summary LEACHM (the Leaching Estimation And CHemistry Model) refers to a suite of simulation models describing the water and chemical regime in unsaturated or partially saturated soil profiles. A m.


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Simulation of nitrogen movement, transformation, and uptake in plant root zone Download PDF EPUB FB2

PLANT UPTAKE OF NITROGEN Nitrogen uptake by plants involves the movement of water soluble nitrogen species (NHi* and N03) to roots transformation by their absorption across the root s. Mass flow arid diffusion are the two major processes by which NHi* and NO3 are transported to the roots.

Simulation of nitrogen movement, transformation, and uptake in plant root zone. Athens, Ga. Environmental Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet.

Davidson J B, Graetz D A, Rao P S C, Selim M () Simulation of nitrogen movement, transformation, and uptake in the plant root zone. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPA–/3–78– Office of Research and Development, Athens, Georgia, USA. Google ScholarCited by: The manuscript by Tanji and Gupta (1) is an excellent review of the state-of-the-art for simulating nitrogen transport and transformations in the plant root zone.

Because of the relative completeness of their review on these two topics, our critique is confined to a discussion of water and nitrogen uptake by : J.M. Davidson, P.S.C. Rao, R.E. Jessup. Simulation of nitrogen dynamics in the soil-plant system where L is the root density, the root surface, 6 is the a is r soil tion, isT and s i|i are and the the soil the bulk soil androo at t is the root radius.

Potential évapotranspiration for the considered evaporation the soil water content at water content at satura-File Size: KB. A model is presented for the simulation of water flow, heat flow, and nitrate and ammonium transport. Two approaches are used for modelling plant water uptake as well as for plant nitrogen uptake.

Nitrogen transformations are accounted for in a very simple way. This paper focuses mainly on water flow modelling, solute transport, and water by: Uptake of nitrogen by roots This note reports a further development of the nitrogen uptake model implemented in Daisy (Hansen et al.

; Hansen and Abrahamsen ). The new development pertains to root uptake kinetics. The simulation of the crop nitrogen demand is unchanged. Transport by dispersion and convection of mobile species of nitrogen, ammonium ion exchange, first order nitrogen transformations, and nitrogen plant uptake are included in the formulation for the vadose zone.

Transport of nitrate in the aquifer is assumed to be affected only by dispersion-convection by: 1. Agricultural production and water quality goals are sometimes in conflict. Our results indicate that simulation modeling can be used to examine the benefits of alternative designs and management strategies, from both production and environmental by: The validated results indicated that % of the applied water percolated below the root zone.

Nitrogen balance within cm deep soil profile indicated that volatilization, denitrification, plant uptake and leaching losses were, and kg N ha−1, respectively. Simulate water movement in soil and water uptake by plant roots, together with the transport and uptake of nutrients. Explicitly take into account the geometry of a root system.

Study how water and nutrient uptake is a ected by the type and shape of the root system. Global atmospheric nitrogen deposition has increased steadily since the 20th century, and has complex effects on terrestrial ecosystems.

This work synthesized results from 54 papers and conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the general response of 15 variables related to plant root traits to simulated nitrogen by: Then, by measuring the isotopie enrichment of the organic and nitrate fraction of the root it is possible to NITROGEN UPTAKE BY PLANTS determine the extent of uptake and reduction of the labelled nitrate in the presence or absence of the competing source of by:   Plants supplied with NO 3 − showed yellowish leaves resembling nitrogen deficiency and grew much slower than those receiving NH 4 + or NH 4 + +NO 3 − irrespective of root-zone pH.

Absorption of NH 4 + was 2- to 34-fold faster than NO 3 − when supplied separately, and 6- to fold faster when supplied simultaneously. Nitrate-grown plants had significantly reduced glutamine Cited by:   The third edition of a standard resource, this book offers a state-of-the-art, multi-disciplinary presentation of plant roots.

It examines structure and development, assemblage of root systems, metabolism and growth, stressful environments, and interactions at the rhizosphere. Reflecting the explosion of advances and emerging technologies in the field, the book presents developments in.

Effect of Nitrogen Form and Root-zone pH on Growth and Nitrogen Uptake of Tea (Camellia sinensis) Plants Article (PDF Available) in Annals of Botany 99(2) March with Reads.

Concerning crop growth modelling, improvements are needed with respect to the partitioning of total dry matter production over the different plant organs in function of the stress, the calculation of the nitrogen stress and the total nitrogen uptake of the crop through a better estimate of the N-demand of the different plant by: ABSTRACT.

Models for simulation of plant uptake of water and nitrogen are critically examined. Inherent complexity of the soil-plant system as well as a general unavailability of the input parameters required in the microscopic-level models precludes model validation at the present time.

Nitrate uptake occurs at the root level and two nitrate transport systems have been shown to coexist in plants and to act co-ordinately to take up nitrate from the soil solution and distribute it within the whole plant (Fig. 1) (review in Daniel-Vedele et al., ; Tsay et al., ).Cited by: Leaf and root detritus and exudates are major sources of soil organic carbon, and their production and nutrient content could be influenced by nitrogen input [19, 24, 58,59].

The fine root biomass. RZWQM2 is a one-dimensional (vertical in the soil profile) process-based model that simulates the growth of the plant and the movement of water, nutrients and pesticides over, within and below the crop root zone of a unit area. It has a quasi-two-dimensional macropore/lateral flow.

Molecular Basis of Nitrate Uptake. Among seven NRT2 genes in Arabidopsis, AtNRT, AtNRT, AtNRT and AtNRT are expressed in the roots of N-deprived plants. Analysis of a quadruple mutant revealed that these four NRT2 transporters account for approximately 95% of high-affinity nitrate influx activity under N limitation, AtNRT being the major contributor (Lezhneva et al.

Cited by: involved in nitrogen uptake, assimilation, and remobilization in crops and model plants. The detection of the lim- iting factors that could be manipulated to increase NUE is the major goal of such.